63: What is Unconventional Leadership. Podcast host, Heather Parady, talks reveals what it is and isn’t – and the questions to ask yourself.

 

How do you pull out what you know about yourself, your type of leadership, and who you are naturally as a person? Heather Parady shares the steps to evaluate if your being unconventional leadership as she shares with host Mike Domitrz.

   

** You are invited to join our community and conversations about each episode on FaceBook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/respectpodcastgroup and join us on Twitter @PodcastRespect or visit our website at www.RespectPodcast.com **

 

TAKEAWAYS:

  1. Journal to help you evaluate who you are as a journal.
  2. Ask those you admire and want to be like as to how they see you.
  3. For finding your purpose, connect with an energy source higher than yourself. Deep dive spiritually (whether religion or energy of the universe).
  4. Attach to a societal good in how we spend our time and energies.
 

Heather’s BIO:

Heather Parady is the host of the Unconventional Leaders podcasts. The show studies leaders from all over the world who have built great things from the ground up. The intention of the show is to empower first-generation self starters to step up, use their voice, and make an impact in the world.

 

LINKS TO HEATHER:

 

BOOKS HEATHER RECOMMENDS:

 

YOUR HOST: Mike Domitrz is the founder of The Center for Respect where he helps educational institutions, the US Military and businesses of all sizes create a culture of respect throughout their organizations. From addressing consent to helping corporations build a workplace free from fear (reducing sexual harassment and helping employees thrive by treating them with respect every day), Domitrz engages audiences by sharing skill sets they can implement into their lives immediately. As an author, trainer, keynote speaker and coach, Mike Domitrz loves working with leaders at all levels. Learn more at http://www.CenterForRespect.com

 

READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPTION of the EPISODE HERE (or download the pdf):

 

Mike Domitrz:
Welcome to the Respect Podcast. I’m your host Mike Domitrz from Mikespeaks.com, where we help organizations of all sizes, educational institutions, and the U.S. military create a culture of respect. Respect is exactly what we discuss on this show, so let’s get started.

Mike Domitrz:
And this week’s guests, we want to get right into it so you get to know Heather Parady, host of the Unconventional Leaders podcast, a show which studies leaders from all over the world who have built something great from the ground up. So Heather, thank you so much for joining us today.

Heather Parady:
Thank you so much Mike, I appreciate it.

Mike Domitrz:
Absolutely. Well let’s dive right in, because you talk about unconventional leaders, we’re all about respect. They really go well together with each other. What do you think is the importance of keeping people at the forefront as a leader. Why is that important and what does it take to be at the forefront of being a leader for an individual out there?

Heather Parady:
Yeah. I think it goes down to what John Maxwell says, which is simply influence and respecting the influence that you do have and honoring that. That can be influence from a massive perspective. You have millions of people following you or it can be influence of those two little eyeballs in your kitchen who are looking at you as a role model. We all have influence and I think recognizing that and to your point, respecting it and honoring that is what it takes to be a leader.

Mike Domitrz:
And so how do you do that? What are specific questions people can ask themselves to evaluate “am I doing that”?

Heather Parady:
Yeah. I think knowing what comes to you naturally I think is really important, which just that self-awareness piece. I think that’s kind of a buzzword right now of becoming self aware. But it’s so important to know who you are naturally and the natural tribe or community or people that gather around you naturally to really understand your type of leadership and who you are naturally and honoring that. I think just doing a basic self analysis, whether that is going out by yourself and just analyzing your life and trends that you’ve seen or things that you naturally enjoy and position.

Heather Parady:
When you think of leadership, it’s always … I don’t know, when I started this show I thought leaders are always these men in business suits who have everything together and carry briefcases in board meetings, and the more I started to realize that leaders were people who just stepped up into their fullness and that requires self analysis. It requires self awareness to really understand who you are to walk into that.

Mike Domitrz:
Is there a process or questions people can ask others to help them see that? Because a lot of times, as you know, people don’t really see themselves the way the rest of the world does, and so they have a biased view of who they are. Sometimes it can actually get in their way, like they can be playing themselves way too small than they need to be to be that unconventional leader.

Heather Parady:
Absolutely. Yeah, I’ve had close friends of mine send me emails and gone through processes with different coaches and say, “Hey Heather, who do you see me as and what are some of my strengths? What are some of my weaknesses?” And I think that’s just an incredible practice. If you have a group of people in your life who can tell you the truth in a loving way to be very honest with you about what they see in you, and also too, asking those questions to people who you want to be like and you respect. Because a lot of times we speak from what we know, so we can even project onto other people our own fears and our own insecurities and so we may seek counsel with someone who is really struggling themselves to see themselves as all that they can be.

Heather Parady:
So being careful, I think who you seek counsel from is really important. I think another thing is journaling, and I know that sounds weird but just this morning I was rereading. I keep one journal every year. I have for the past 15 years and I’m constantly rereading back over different years and I was in 2009 this morning reading through some stuff. I saw some reoccurring themes back 10 years ago, things that I’m still struggling with now and I’m like, “Hey Heather, there’s a sign that there’s some stuff that’s really internal going on with you as a person, as a leader that you need to address. It’s not circumstantial, this is something to do with you.” And I think having a journal that you can reflect back on is a really powerful thing to do as well.

Mike Domitrz:
I love journaling. I notice a big difference when I don’t journal versus when I do. Where my day is, where my mindset’s at, especially at a place of gratitude.

Heather Parady:
Yes.

Mike Domitrz:
And what that can help us be grateful for when we’re journaling. It’s so much more powerful there. So here we are. It’s Unconventional Leader, that’s your podcast. What does it mean? When somebody says, “Well, why is it unconventional? Isn’t that just leadership?” So what’s the difference?

Heather Parady:
It started when I was a therapist. I was a youth therapist and I worked in a children’s home and I was working with these young girls who had so much potential. It was unreal, their talent, their ability, and they just didn’t see it in themselves, and for good reason. I mean, they had literally been thrown out by their families, by society. They had no one, and so as you can imagine, being in a vulnerable state at that age anyway and then having those circumstances, it was all they could do to just survive. And as therapists that was really what we were there to do, is to help them cope and get through the day. I started to really question that idea of just coping and just surviving and started really seeing the potential that these young women had even at 14, 15 years old.

Heather Parady:
I just started to ask myself, what the difference between someone who goes through complete hell and has struggled so much and steps into their greatness and all that they can be and they make a big difference in this world, versus someone who goes through the exact same thing and ends up in jail or on the street or dealing with major mental disorders their entire life? I didn’t really know the answer to that, and to be honest, I still don’t know the answer but I wanted to set out on a journey to ask that question and hear stories from people who have come from unconventional places, who have struggled and really shouldn’t have made it and did. And I don’t mean just simply quote successful terms of making X amount of dollars or whatever, but really overcoming their own internal battle, honoring, respecting that influence that they do have, and using their voice, making an impact in this world.

Mike Domitrz:
So with that, you’re talking about finding that voice. Do you believe that people have a calling or a purpose, or do you think that’s something that that’s too focused on and people should gain that skill that they’ll get a purpose and a calling for once they’re accomplished?

Heather Parady:
Oh Mike, I’m a super spiritual girl so I absolutely believe in calling and purpose, and I think that it’s not a definite like this is your calling and this is your purpose. I think it’s more of a state that you enter into, that you are walking in at your calling, that you are walking in at your purpose and that’s going to lead and direct you into a multitude of different things in at different times. I think we get stuck on the titles and the plans and all that. And trust me, I have a spreadsheet for everything, but I think it’s more of a spiritual state that you’re in.

Mike Domitrz:
So how does somebody get there? You know, I know a lot of people who will say to me, they’re like, “Hey Mike, you have this calling. You have this purpose in your life.” I don’t have one and I don’t feel there’s one out there. So how do you help somebody find that?

Heather Parady:
I think it’s getting in a deep, deep connection with the higher being. So God, universe, whatever you want to call it. For me, it’s God. Just really connecting to something greater than yourself and finding, like I said at the very beginning, that thing that comes really, really natural to you. I think that’s what people mean, Mike, when they say that to you, that calling on your life, because the uniqueness of the human being is just amazing. And to think about what I would study years and years to do would come naturally to you, Mike, in just a moment or a second, I think points and gives us hints towards things we should be walking in.

Heather Parady:
Really, honoring your calling is I think honoring yourself and honoring the gifts that you have and putting people and mission at the forefront of your mind. You know, creating something that’s going to outlast you. Something that’s greater than just building Heather’s empire, building Mike’s empire just for the sake of doing it, but actually attaching a vision and a mission behind it.

Mike Domitrz:
And along that journey, you believe that Adler’s of human behavior, the underdog, the unconventional ideas on leadership, you believe that plays a role. So one, can you explain what it is for those who are going, “what are you talking about” and two, how it plays a role?

Heather Parady:
Yeah, Adler was super cool. He was a psychologist way back in the day when Freud was a starting to write his books and people started to know who he is. He was actually another psychologist that was underneath Freud for a little bit of time until they split ways. But he had his own idea of why we are the way we are, and his thought was that we are all born with this sense of inferiority and that inferiority can be “I grew up poor, I’m not worthy” or “I grew up with this disability, I’m not worthy” or, “I have this color in my skin or this gender” or whatever it may be. “My dad didn’t love me,” or whatever that issue is, we all have this inferiority and what we do is that we work our entire lives to try to overcompensate for that and to work for that.

Heather Parady:
What I loved about his theory, and I think all psychologists had some truth to their idea, is he taught that that’s a natural think. You know, like I grew up poor so I’m going to work really hard to try to make money, and there’s nothing inherently wrong with that. That’s just kinda how we’re wired because of the way we grew up, but what we can do so it doesn’t turn into dysfunction is to attach a deeper purpose and a deeper “why” to that, which he called societal good.

Heather Parady:
So if I were to say, “I grew up without the love of a father and I’m overcompensating for that in this negative way, how can I use that pain? How can I use that struggle? How can I use that inferiority to actually shape and mold a powerful message that will end up changing people’s lives?” And so it’s not something that you quote overcome, it’s something that you shift into something that’s more productive.

Mike Domitrz:
When you speak about how the impact of how we grow up plays a role there, and you’ve mentioned previously prior to the show about growing up without an education. What do you mean by that? I could hear people thinking, well what do you mean you grew up without an education?

Heather Parady:
Literally without education. I was homeschooled. I’m doing the air quotes in the air. My education stopped around, gosh, I would say around seventh grade and it was really shaky even before then. My mom suffered from severe mental health issues and my dad left when I was around 12 years old, and so our education, mine and my sister’s, was really next to none. I remember trying a little bit at an elementary school and we did some things, not full days of school by any means. I knew how to read and write and do some very, very basic math, but I wouldn’t progress past that. It would just wasn’t there.

Heather Parady:
I really struggled with inferiority, as you can imagine, of just like, “Oh, I’m never going to get a real job. I’m never going to make money.” It was just not even an option to me. So going through college and then getting my master’s degree and all of that, it was a huge eye opener to me about the element of grit. That how powerful grit can be, because I’m not naturally smart. I struggled really, really, really bad in school. I YouTubed my way through it. I tell people all the time, I YouTubed so much stuff learning some of the really basic things, but that element of grit, I learned fast. That there were people with predispositions in there towards just natural tendencies to memorize and all of that, and I kept up with them, and not because I was at their level, but because I wanted it so, so bad. So I talk a lot about grit in this show and believe in it with all my heart because of that experience.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, and yet grit is intelligence. So you must have a lot of smarts and intelligence to do everything you just said, “I figured it out by going to YouTube, I figured it out.” You problem solved. Yeah, and so I think it’s always interesting, formal education versus education, right? They’re very different yet you can be genius. There are geniuses out there without formal education. So there’s history of human existence where that’s true, and yet you did go on and get a master’s. So you got in to college, you were able to do all of that, which says a lot in there. So you came from that underdog position, which is something you talk about, and you talk about the fact how that builds humility and a big picture approach. What do you mean that underdog is more likely to create a big picture approach?

Heather Parady:
Sure. Well it can. Again, it goes back to that variable of what’s the difference between person A and person B? Person A can get a major chip on their shoulder and is like, “Screw the world, I’m going to crawl on everybody that I can to get to the top.” But if you shift, kind of like Adler talks about, and look at societal good and attach yourself to a bigger purpose, then it can give you another element of compassion and empathy for people that you’re trying to reach, which really I think makes an incredible leader is when you can see people for people and love them for who they are, no matter what level or state that you’re at.

Heather Parady:
I think when you have a personal experience of yeah, I grew up poor, too. Yeah, I didn’t have a mom. Yeah I didn’t, et cetera, et cetera, then it’s easier to connect with people on a human level. So often our disadvantages actually can become our competitive advantages, not only from an emotional state that we are able to connect with people more, but people also can respect us more because they said, “Hey, Mike’s been through some stuff and I can trust Mike because I understand where he’s coming from because that was me, too.”

Mike Domitrz:
How does somebody overcome the always trying to live up, always trying to make up for what I lacked, falling into that trap. You’ll hear it with this awful analogy you hear people say when somebody is short, right? The Napoleon concept. That idea that they have this Napoleon Syndrome, whatever the term is. I’m having a brain freeze right now, but that you’re always overcompensating for the lack of whatever it is you felt you didn’t have in life, whether it was education or whether it was opportunity. How does somebody avoid that?

Heather Parady:
I don’t know if you can, Mike. I don’t know if it’s something that you’re ever fully like, checkbox, I’m healed from this and I’m full. I think what happens, and again, this is just my limited experience of 32 years, I may learn something different but as of right now I don’t see a complete end to that. What I see is a healthy understanding of your motivations and trying to constantly keep yourself in check, keeping yourself accountable to what your actions are. I mean, there are many times I say, “Yeah Heather, you’re doing this for the right reasons,” and I really believe that, and then I really stop and I’m still with myself again, going back to that self awareness and that quiet time and that journaling and reflecting and talking to people who you can really trust, checking yourself. Am I working really hard at this because I have grit and I’m determined, or am I trying to prove something? Where’s my worth? Where is my validation coming from?

Heather Parady:
That is such a hard … That is the question for humanity. Why are we like that and how can we get it? I believe that there is an element that comes from God and from a higher being that you have to attach yourself to that. For those who don’t believe in that, it’s something within yourself. You have to attach yourself to something outside of performance, of being, I believe, that you’re going to find that worth and that value from. Because otherwise we’ll just run ourselves into the ground. I know I will. I’m definitely a type A do-er person.

Mike Domitrz:
Oh, I’m the same way. You can easily fall into the trap of how many listeners do I have? How many people like that post I put up on social media. So easy to fall into that trap, even as grown adults, as mature, older adults. And you tell kids don’t get caught up in the popularity, and yet you get caught up in that validation that can happen. So I think it’s so important of that, “What am I seeking, where is my validation?” So I’m careful of that. So I’m honoring that. And you talk about specifically putting yourself out to the world, being consistent in your content. What do you mean by that?

Heather Parady:
Yeah, well you talk about respect on the show. I think as a leader, as someone who is stepping out and trying to put their message out there, whether they’re podcasting or a blog. Yes, this has become a really popular way to kind of quote step into leadership in this online space, which is so tricky. But I see over and over again people really struggling with just the consistency piece. I want to start this nonprofit, I want to write this book, I want to do this, I want to do that, and ideas are one thing and execution is another. And I will even go further, that execution without continual follow through is even another thing.

Heather Parady:
And that’s where I see a lot of people having a hard time and building trust with your tribe and really showing up fully as the kind of leader that you want to be requires you to show up when it’s not going well and when it is. When you do see those numbers and you’re happy, and then when you see those numbers and you’re not happy and still showing up consistently. So yeah, one of the things that I help a content creators do, leaders, people who are putting their message out there, is to not only start, because that’s one piece, but also hang in there and be consistent and show up. Because again, that’s showing respect.

Heather Parady:
If I were to say to you, Mike, I’m going to come to your house every single day and bring you a donut. Tomorrow is national donut day so that’s why I’m saying this. And I do that, I do that every single Tuesday, and then one day I just stop showing up. You’re gonna be like, “Where did Heather go?” And then let’s say three months later I show up and I act like that nothing ever happened, and I don’t mention I was gone, I don’t do anything and I just give you another donut. You’re not going to trust me. You’re like, “This girl is a quack.” Right?

Heather Parady:
And we do that over and over and over again within the online space or as leaders is we say, “Hey, I’m going to lead you in this way. I’m going to show up for you. I’m going to give you this, I’m going to do that.” And we build this trust and this relationship with these people that we feel quote, called to serve. And they look up one day and we’re gone, and they’re like, “Where did she go?” That puts bad taste in your mouth, and for good reason. So I just think in the online space and the leadership space, we have to treat relationships like real relationships as if it were face to face, if it were somebody that we personally knew, whether we do or we don’t, because that’s just part of respect.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, you just walked us right in that conversation which is being that entrepreneur. You’re a podcast host, you work with entrepreneurs. How do you balance that entrepreneur life and your relationships? I mean, it’s so easy for us who run our own organizations and companies to constantly go back to the website and look at something I need to improve or a project I’m working on. There is always something we can dive into and we want to, that’s the scary part. Right? There are people go, “Well at work I always have something that I can dive into.” But you want to. A lot of people who are at work are like, “Oh I wish I didn’t have to do this project,” where the entrepreneurial mindset is “I want to be in there”. So how do you balance that?

Heather Parady:
Man, question of the century, right? Imperfectly right now. I would say that I have the most generous and kind husband ever in the world and I really don’t know how people can without good communication and someone who they can really … Because that’s what it is, it’s communication. Brian and I, he has his own business too, but we meet once a week on Saturday morning and we make a pot of coffee and we sit down at the table and it’s just like a business, but it’s our relationship. We sit there and we say, “Hey, this is going on this week and this is what to expect, and what can we get do better?” And we actually look at all the categories in our lives from relationships to health to business to our children, and just analyze that. It only takes about 20 or 30 minutes, believe it or not.

Heather Parady:
But something small like that is huge because it opens communication. And also again, that respect element of saying, “Hey Brian, I respect you just as much as I respect my business. I love you,” and vice versa. So that’s been really, really huge. One thing I learned recently from a previous guest, Graham Cochrane. He’s incredible. He’s built a multimillion dollar business online and he built it from the ground up with strong work hours in place. Which hurt my feelings, Mike. I was like, what are you talking about, work hours? What does that mean? I get done when I get done.

Heather Parady:
But he gave a really good argument for your relationships and your mental health to actually put a stop of “I’m quitting work X”. I actually have time off here. I mean, he did that when he was at zero all the way until a million dollars, having strong work boundaries. I’ve been trying to practice that over the few months imperfectly, Mike, I’ll be honest with you, but it’s something I’m trying to practice because again, I’ve got these little eyeballs in here looking at me and you can build a whole world, but if relationships are gone, was it worth it?

Mike Domitrz:
It’s so important. And we found that in our lives too, that you’ve got to be able to set those boundaries. So, so important. Now you did something unique. We mentioned it earlier. You got your master’s degree, and then as you put, you decided to put the degree in the closet and podcast instead. So what was that like, risk wise? What drove you to it? How did you overcome fears, concerns?

Heather Parady:
Madness. That’s what drove me to it, Mike. It was crazy. Sometimes I still ask myself like, “Heather, what are you doing? You worked seven years to get this degree.” And it was a dream of mine. I mean, I even read over when I was a teenager and I wrote, “I want to be a therapist one day.” I started building a business in graduate school and I fell in love with it. I would go home and when most people would go home and curl up with their Freud and Adler books and read more about that, I would go and listen to Gary V and you know, online business and SEO and all of this stuff. I was just amazed by it, and what really drew me to it is the potential for good people to do huge work through the online space. I’m talking like cultural change.

Heather Parady:
You know, we talk a lot about monetary wise what we can do. There’s no cap on how much you can make in the online space. If you think about impact, too. We’re talking into a microphone and people from all over the world are hearing us. It’s incredible. It’s an incredible time to live in, and this may be a random season in my life, whatever. I just knew in my heart that if I did not follow that quote calling that we’re going to go back to, that nudge, that thing that was really drawing me, then I would always wonder what if.

Heather Parady:
That was a few years ago and I don’t regret it at all. It’s put me in contact with people I never would have met. I’ve talked to insane amount of people all the time and are able to help people in a different way than I thought I was going to be able to. Yeah, I think if you have that nudge, that natural curiosity, the thing that keeps you up at night, I think it’s worth looking at and taking a little bit of a risk.

Mike Domitrz:
Well that’s awesome. And you have two books you recommend, Gifts of Imperfection I’ve talked about on the show. I love Renee Brown. So I’m going to ask you about the other one, What To Do When It’s Your Turn. I think the subtitle is “And It’s Always Your Turn” by Seth Goden. So why that book, Heather?

Heather Parady:
Because Seth Goden is amazing. If you do not follow him, I highly, highly recommend his work. He is an unconventional marketer in the sense of he has a philosophy around marketing that again, going back to those natural gifts and the things that you want to use, that they’re not yours. They’re there to be given away, and sometimes it’s not going to work and sometimes it’s going to be messy, but the entire point of it is to show up and again, be consistent.

Heather Parady:
I loved that book specifically because he was very creative in the way that he physically wrote the book. It looks like a magazine. There are so many stories and the format of it is really, really unique. But the message in it is there’s so many people waiting saying, “Oh, it’s not my season. It’s not my time. I’ll start that later. I’ll do that.” And what Seth is saying is it’s your turn now. It’s always your turn. You have to step up, step into it, and give the gift that you have to the world.

Mike Domitrz:
Love it. Thank you so much Heather. I want to make sure that all of our listeners can find you, and the website’s easy. Heatherparady.com, it’s P-A-R-A-D-Y.

Mike Domitrz:
And of course, if you’re listening to my podcast, that means you listen to at least one podcast, so check out Heather’s podcasts, the Unconventional Leaders podcast, which is a great podcast in and of itself. So thank you Heather, very much for joining us.

Heather Parady:
Mike, I’m so honored. Thank you.

Mike Domitrz:
Absolutely. For all of our listeners, you know what’s next. That is question of the week. Before I answer this week’s question of the week, I’d love to ask you a question. Would you please subscribe to this podcast, the Respect Podcast with Mike Domitrz? By subscribing, you can make a huge impact.

Mike Domitrz:
Now you might be wondering, Mike, how does my subscribing to your podcast make a huge impact? Well, here’s how. For every person that subscribes, it raises the rankings of the show in the search engines. So for people who care about respect like yourself, when they’re doing a search for podcasts, they’re more likely to find this show, thus providing an awesome opportunity for us to spread more respect around this world, and all you do is hit subscribe under your podcast.

Mike Domitrz:
Plus the second benefit is, by subscribing, you automatically get every episode right into your phone or whatever device you’re listening to the podcast on. It happens automatically, so subscribing also makes your life easier. Now let’s get into this week’s question of the week. Oh, and by the way, you can always ask your questions of the week by joining us on Facebook in our discussion group. It’s called the Respect Podcast discussion group. Go there on Facebook and ask whatever questions you would like me to answer and or address in this segment of the show, and then listen to each episode to find out when your question is included.

Mike Domitrz:
Today’s question is, Mike, do you prefer when someone is direct with you or takes a softer approach with you? Which do you prefer? Well, I know I prefer a softer approach, like a loving, softer approach. What actually works most effective with me is a direct approach. I think one of the problems with even what I said before about a soft loving approach, it implies that a direct approach is not loving, when it can be very loving and difficult to hear. Not but difficult to hear, and difficult to hear.

Mike Domitrz:
And for me, I know that while that has the most likely chance for me to push back, is the direct impact, the direct statement where I’m going to be like “Yeah, but …” and I’m more likely to push back on that, in the longterm I’m gonna think more about that. I’m going to evaluate that more. It’s going to make me really think about what they said and is it true? And if it is, what do I need to do if that’s bothering so much to shift within myself so that that’s not true anymore. So that that’s not a statement that if I thought of myself and that was attached to me, that would disappoint me in that being attached with me.

Mike Domitrz:
So it allows me to have that conversation with me, and direct tends to do that with me. When I think of profound moments in my life where somebody said something, it was almost always a situation where somebody was very direct. At the time it might have been very difficult. It was exactly what I needed to hear. So for me, I prefer direct. That doesn’t mean that there aren’t times where you need that loving approach, without a doubt. I just know for me the most transformative moments have usually started with a direct statement.

Mike Domitrz:
What about you? What do you prefer? I’d love to hear your answer in our Facebook group, which is the Respect Podcast discussion group on Facebook. Love to hear your answer. Please go on there and let us know.

Mike Domitrz:
Do you know what I would love? I would love to hear your answer to this week’s question of the week. So would you please answer what your answer would have been if you were asked that question today on the show? All you do is go to our Facebook page. We have a special group where we have these discussions called the Respect Podcast discussion group. So the Respect Podcast discussion group, and share with us what would your answer have been to this week’s question of the week and take a moment, post us a new question for future episodes. What question would you like to hear me answer on an upcoming episode? That’s all done on Facebook in our special group, which is the Respect Podcast discussion group. Can’t wait to see you there.

Mike Domitrz:
Thank you for joining us in this episode of the Respect Podcast, exploring work love and life. And this episode, like every episode, is brought to you by our organization, the Center for Respect, which you can find at centerforrespect.com, and of course you can find me your host, Mike Domitrz, at mikespeaks.com. Thank you so much for joining us.

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