68: Are you managing your time or your energy? Which gets the priority and why? Discover this fascinating conversation with Robyn Pearce.

Are you frequently late? Do you know someone who is? That might be because the person is an “In Time” person. Discover how to gain skills and strategies from Robyn Pearce from overcoming those struggles with host Mike Domitrz. Do you need “Energy” management or “Time” management?

   

** You are invited to join our community and conversations about each episode on FaceBook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/respectpodcastgroup and join us on Twitter @PodcastRespect or visit our website at www.RespectPodcast.com **

 


STORIES

When still a young single mum on government benefits, told I couldn’t have a job I was well qualified for because I was ‘a single mum and therefore unreliable’ (this was well before I’d learnt about respecting time, but it was the defining moment when I said to myself, ‘I’ll show the &%$#!’ I respected/valued myself more highly than the cautious and narrow-minded selection board of 12 worthy town dignitaries.

 

Robyn’s BIO:

People always ask me why I teach time management. Well, to put it simply, it’s because I used to be bad at it! Yes I can honestly say I’ve walked in your moccasins.

And my path has taken some interesting turns… 

First I was a librarian, then a farmer’s wife and mother of six (including an intellectually handicapped foster son until he was 16).

Following this I ended up a solo mother on government benefit…

After a few long years I decided to fight my way out of the poverty trap (dabbling in tourism along the way) and became a very successful real estate agent.Real estate taught me I had to learn better time management skills – or sink! To start with I was kicked out of meetings because I was late. PLUS: I burnt out numerous times from overwork and poor time habits.Frustrated with complaints about my lack of time management skills, a wise friend pointed me in the direction of a decent diary and a few key time management principles.

Since then, through much study, trial and error, my once great weakness has transmuted into a major strength and an international business… 

I reckon I’ve had the best possible background for running a time management business – I really do understand how it feels to be out of control!

It’s a huge buzz these days helping others make the same changes to their life as they learn and practice the many simple and practical productivity habits that changed my life so dramatically.And these days I need all the great time skills I’ve learnt over the years! The family has now expanded to include 17 grandchildren, and then there’s all the fun things and people I enjoy hanging out with – sailing, kayaking, cycling, dancing, music, learning guitar, reading, writing, films, travel and heaps of wonderful friends and extended family. (Oh, and business of course!).

 

Links to Robyn:

 

Books Robyn Recommends:

 

YOUR HOST: Mike Domitrz is the founder of The Center for Respect where he helps educational institutions, the US Military and businesses of all sizes create a culture of respect throughout their organizations. From addressing consent to helping corporations build a workplace free from fear (reducing sexual harassment and helping employees thrive by treating them with respect every day), Domitrz engages audiences by sharing skill sets they can implement into their lives immediately. As an author, trainer, keynote speaker and coach, Mike Domitrz loves working with leaders at all levels. Learn more at http://www.CenterForRespect.com

 

READ THE FULL TRANSCRIPTION of the EPISODE HERE (or download the pdf):

 

Mike Domitrz:
Welcome to The RESPECT Podcast. I’m your host Mike Domitrz from MikeSpeaks.com, where we help organizations of all sizes, educational institutions, and the U S military create a culture of respect, and respect is exactly what we discussed on this show. So, let’s get started.

Mike Domitrz:
This week we have Robyn Pearce, known around the world as the Time Queen. Used to be terrible with her time management. However, once she sorted out her bad habits, people started knocking on her door, and for the last 20 years she has worked with clients around the world helping them win their time battles. Thank you, Robyn, for joining us.

Robyn Pearce:
My pleasure, Mike. It’s wonderful to be on your show.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, I’m glad to have you here. We’re going to dive right in. How does time management and respect … What are their roles? How do they work together?

Robyn Pearce:
Time is something that we all need to respect, and the people that struggle with their time management are often accused of not respecting the people, the time of the people around them. Now, there is another story to that which perhaps we might dive into at some point, but it is really important to be able to respect other people’s time. That’s a fairly obvious statement, but yet it’s surprising how many people struggle with it.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, is it that a lot of people don’t realize that what they’re doing is disrespecting people’s time, but they don’t see it that way? They’re like, “Hey, if I’m …” You shared once a story, I believe, about you being late, and how that impacted. I’ll let you go with that. You have a story about that.

Robyn Pearce:
I do, I do have a story about that. In fact, it wasn’t the trigger that got me into studying time management, but it certainly had a huge impact at the time. It was before I had even dreamed that I might end up working around the world helping people with their time. I was working for a sales company, and the boss came around at about one o’clock one afternoon. He said, “Sales meeting in my office at 3:00.”

Robyn Pearce:
Now in those days, my time skills were pretty poor, and I had a particular habit which was just see if I can fit in one more thing. I thought I was being efficient, but what I wasn’t doing was being respectful. So, here we are, I’m sitting at my desk about 10 to 3:00, and I’ve noticed … It might have been five to 3:00, something like that. I noticed my colleagues walking into my boss’s office. Unusually, I actually heard the door shut. Usually it was left open until everybody got into the meeting.

Robyn Pearce:
As I was approaching the time for this meeting, I’d thought to myself, “I could just get in one more phone call.” So I put my headphones on, and I dialed another prospect and was in the middle of this call while my colleagues were walking into the boss’s office. I finished the call at about five past 3:00. Thought, “Right, well, I’d better go to the toilet ,and I’d better get a cup of coffee.” Typically, the meetings would be half to three-quarters of an hour.

Robyn Pearce:
At about 10 past 3:00, juggling coffee, diary, and something to write with, I walked in, opened the boss’s door and walked in to be greeted by a very angry face. He glared at me. In fact, he pointed at me and he shouted. He said, “Get out of my office. Nobody comes to my meetings late.” Oh, he was so angry.

Robyn Pearce:
I slunk out of there like I’m wishing the floor would open up, and I was so embarrassed. A little while later after the meeting was finished, my colleagues all walked past with smirks on their faces, and the next day the boss came to me. He said, “Robyn, we’re going for a walk.”

Robyn Pearce:
I thought, “Oh dear, I’m really in deep stuff here.”

Robyn Pearce:
We went back around the block and he said, “Look, I’m sorry I had to embarrass you yesterday, but that was done to me years ago when I worked for a big firm that I was worth, and it fixed me from being late for my meetings. I just thought it was time you were made an example of.” I was never late again, Mike.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, and that’s just it, some people say, “Yeah, but the call I was on was so important.” That means that our call, in that case, we believe is more important than all those people in that room that agreed on a time or that was agreed upon time, you know, by a boss saying whatever, not showing up. That’s where I think a lot of people struggle.

Mike Domitrz:
Like, look, when we don’t show up on time and we go, “Well, it’s because I had this or I had that or I had this going on,” what we are saying to the person who was on time is that my stuff, my being late, that’s more of our priority than you because you sat there waiting for me. That was worth it because I needed to do these things over here. Right? That’s essentially what can be felt.

Robyn Pearce:
It is exactly that.

Robyn Pearce:
Now, there is an interesting point about this, which I didn’t discover until many years later when I was studying neurolinguistic programming, or NLP, as many people will know it. In fact, there are two different personality profiles, if you like, when it comes to … And it’s my terminology. It might be called something differently in some other way of thinking about it, but there are two different distinct personalities in terms of time. One is what is known as in time people, and the other is through time people.

Robyn Pearce:
What is behind this is that the people who are consistently late actually don’t mean to be disrespectful. What they’re really terrified of is wasting time, ironically. So, a through time person is able to detach themselves from time, and it’s as if they can see the passing of time and how much time they need in order to reach certain deadlines, get out the door at certain times.

Robyn Pearce:
Whereas a in time person, they’re not called in time because they’re on time, they are called it that because they are in the moment to such a degree that they don’t actually notice the passing of time. They’ll be working away on something, come up for air, and then go, “Oh my lord, is that the time?” They [inaudible 00:06:11] somewhere, and then there’s this mad scurry because they are supreme optimists in how much they’re going to get fitted in, and they are unaware. It’s as if the time is going through them rather than in that detached way. There are quick little things that … Well, quick to explain, but not so quick to learn. And the reason I can talk about this is because I am by nature one of those in time people and was this consistently late person.

Robyn Pearce:
One of the techniques is to get somewhere first. In other words, don’t stop and do the other things. Go early, get somewhere early, and then do the extra things, which these days is so much easier because we’ve got so much workers [inaudible 00:06:54] on our … the little things we carry in our pockets or our purses.

Robyn Pearce:
Another one, a really big one is don’t do the one last thing. That’s the solution. What people will say is, “Oh, just do this one more thing,” or, “I’ve just got time for,” blah, blah, blah, whatever it might be. As soon as you hear yourself thinking, “I can just fit in one more job,” or, “I can fit in that extra phone call,” or, “I’ll just hang up the washing,” if you’re a domestic goddess, don’t do those things because they are the guarantees, the guaranteed items that were going to make you late. So, don’t do the last thing. Just get out the door at the time that you start to think, “I should go.” What the time people are doing is they are fluffing around. Well, they’re not fluffing around. They think they’re been efficient, but they’re actually trying to squeeze in too much.

Mike Domitrz:
Yeah, and I think we’ve all fallen into that. That’s the old example you see in life all the time. Right? It’s five o’clock, but I’ve got one more thing, and you end up missing the kid’s event or the start of something back home because you try to do that one last thing back at the office.

Robyn Pearce:
That’s exactly right. It would be seen in that case that there’s no respect shown to the child’s event if you’re the parent that just hasn’t showed up, for example. That person’s often quite hurt because they think, “I really, really want to be at that event, but I just had to do that one last important,” in inverted commas, “thing.”

Mike Domitrz:
You’re all about time management, what we’re discussing right now, obviously. How do you define it? Like, when people say time management, what does that mean for you?

Robyn Pearce:
I’ve modified that over the 27 years I’ve been working in this field, Mike, and I now say it’s not really time management that we’re talking about but energy management. If we manage our energy, as well as there’s a whole raft of things behind that, but if we can manage our energy, we will have the capacity to do the things that need to be done. We’ll be able to think more clearly, to act more efficiently, [inaudible 00:08:56] able to watch out for the small efficiencies that will go to the greater good.

Mike Domitrz:
How does somebody identify energy management? What are steps they can take?

Robyn Pearce:
I think we all know that intuitively. Whenever I say this in a room as I’m giving speeches or running training programs, wherever I happen to be around the world, and I make that statement, the room goes quiet and people stop. You can see them going inwards and thinking, “Energy, yes.”

Robyn Pearce:
When I’ve got high energy, which goes hand in hand with good health and having got enough sleep, and those kind of things, then I function better. So, it’s not just about what we call time, it’s the way we manage ourselves in relation to that time.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, that’s brilliant because I think so many people miss out on that whole concept of where’s my energy right now in this moment. I think the part people miss is the why. Like, they’ll say, “Oh, I’m tired because I’m doing so much,” but they don’t stop and go, “Well, what could have been done so I had energy in this moment?” Which is what you’re discussing, right?

Robyn Pearce:
Absolutely. Here’s a little simple one which people might be slightly surprised to hear me say, but I’ll come back to why in a second, is that I’m a really big believer in power naps, 20, 15, 10, even 10 minutes. If you’re sitting at your computer or you’re doing a task, and your eyes are needing matchsticks to keep them open, or you’re just getting really sluggish and you can’t function effectively, well, get away from that work. Now, sometimes you’re not …

Robyn Pearce:
Many people are not in an environment where they can take a little nap, but if you are or if you’ve got the kind of employer that accepts that this is an integral part of our energy management, then obviously, take the chance. If you’re working from home, self-employed, it might be just push your chair back and … I’ve got so many stories about that, but equally, it could be get outside in the fresh air, go for a walk, get away from your desk and change your activity so that you are starting to bring the energy back.

Robyn Pearce:
The reason that I talk about this one is that our energy goes in cycles of what they call ultradian rhythms. Ultra means many, dian means day, ultradian rhythms. [inaudible 00:11:20] it’s about 45 minutes up and then 45 minutes down, typically. The up cycle is 90 to 120 minutes, and then down at the bottom of that energy cycle is a dip, and that is typically 15 to 20 minutes. Airline pilots know this really well. They work in shifts of about 45 minutes, apparently.

Mike Domitrz:
Just so I’m understanding right, you said there’s an up and then there’s a down, it equals about an hour and a half, roughly. Is the-

Robyn Pearce:
And then there’s a dip below that.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, after the 90 minutes.

Robyn Pearce:
Yes, yes. Now, if you’re working out at a gym, anyone who does any kind of fitness will know that they’re told to take a rest, a short pause after they’ve done a series of reps, for example, in doing weights or any kind of strength training. And the reason for that pause is so that the body can recharge. It’s actually really important, but what happens in the business world so often or in our busy lives, we think, “Oh, no, I can’t afford to stop right now. I’ve got to push through,” when it’s really nonsense because if you don’t stop, you are not allowing your body to recharge. You’re not allowing even your brain to recharge, and you’re pushing your body constantly into a state of flight or fight.

Mike Domitrz:
So, how do you help the person who’s sitting there going, “I don’t have time to pause. I have so much on my plate.” I could be parenting, it could be work, it could be I’m a caregiver for someone. How do you help that person?

Robyn Pearce:
Once they’ve actually tried stepping away and just giving themselves that short pause, they will find that they’re more effective on the other side of that. A little phrase that I have is, in order to go faster, first we must go slower. Some of the practical things about that, most of us have got some sort of phone these days, a smart … Many of us have got smartphones, so turn it to silent, but put an alert on there that just gives yourself however many minutes you’ve got. It might be only five, but put that alert on and get yourself somewhere quiet.

Robyn Pearce:
An example, in commercial world, I was doing some work in London with a bunch of CEOs from different organizations. There was one gentleman who his company had just fitted out Google in London. [inaudible 00:13:43] big offices there. Apparently, and some of your listeners will know more about this than I, but apparently Google and companies such as that are now creating quiet rooms where the staff, they are not allowed to do any work in there. It’s for meditation, for prayer, for quietness. They are encouraging people to do that because they know that these pauses make a difference. And Arianna Huffington and her book Thrive talks about the [inaudible 00:14:12].

Mike Domitrz:
Yeah, she’s a big believer in meditation and taking that time for quiet, and what a power it can have.

Mike Domitrz:
In addition to taking that pause, which is brilliant, makes sense, what are other mistakes people can make and failing to do? Because that’s what we’re failing to do, we’re failing to pause. What are some of the major mistakes we can make when it comes to our time and our energy?

Robyn Pearce:
Oh, one big one is not creating chunks of uninterrupted time. Now, one of the big culprits on this, Mike, is email, having email on all the time and having alerts on all the time. What is therefore happening is that people are never getting a break without multiple, multiple interruptions. There is a vast amount of research now done by people like Microsoft, Google, all sorts of people. An organization called the IOG, Information Overload Research Organization, Group, or something like that, they’ve done a vast amount of research on this. An average knowledge worker in today’s busy world loses a minimum of 25 to 28% of productive time per day due to interruptions.

Robyn Pearce:
Email is one of the big culprits because the people that have got email coming at them all the time, either on their smart watch or on their computers or their phones, or whatever, they are never getting quality thinking time. They are being constantly interrupted, and it’s not the time of the interruption only. It’s also the time taken to reconnect back into whatever you were doing before, and there is this enormous slippage and wastage.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, that makes sense. If you’re in a problem solving situation or a task, and suddenly you step out of that, and then you try to come back to it, there’s a different energy you’re in, right? Responding to an email is a very different energy than creating problem solving.

Robyn Pearce:
Totally. It’s a lower-level activity, and obviously we have to manage those things, but the solution is to be chunking our time into blocks of high-level, high-value time where you don’t take interruptions, and you block them out in whatever ways are appropriate for yourself. If you’re in a company, it may be that people around you are supporting you for your [inaudible 00:16:33] time is one term, or thinking time, or whatever terms you want to use. And then maybe you’re doing it for your colleagues later on because so many people live and work in open-plan environments.

Robyn Pearce:
If you’ve got more control over your environment, the ones who have got doors that they could shut these days or the facility to work in blocks of time or chunks of time, they are the ones that have got better control. That’s all good, but so many of us don’t. However, we can still carve out blocks of time when we don’t take those calls or look at those emails, and then we go for another block of time. It might be only 10 or 15 minutes every hour if you have to answer emails constantly, but nobody really should be have to go for less than half an hour in dealing with email. The world has got ridiculous if you can’t cope that long without a response.

Mike Domitrz:
Absolutely.

Mike Domitrz:
Now, you’re bringing up technology and alerts and notifications. Are there positive examples of how technology can help us with that time and energy management?

Robyn Pearce:
Oh, totally. I can’t imagine what the business would be like today. Well, we would be doing … Well, we know what we would be doing, it would be back like last century stuff. It’s amazing. You and I are having this conversation right now, it’s not costing us a dime, et cetera, et cetera. I love that.

Robyn Pearce:
Things like Xero, which I know is used internationally as one of the accounting packages, which came out of New Zealand incidentally. Did you tell the people I’m a new Zealander and live in New Zealand?

Mike Domitrz:
I did not, no.

Robyn Pearce:
If my voice sounds a little different than an American voice, yes, it does. Xero, which is spelled X-E-R-O, is a fabulous accounting package which has got your accounting all in the cloud. That’s just one example. There are so many wonderful things [inaudible 00:18:31] I would hate to be doing my work today. Like publishing in the digital world, that’s something with all of my eight time management books that I’ve written. I’ve now just completed, or on the last few days of getting all of those books now wide into the digital space for people anywhere around the world, and nothing has to be shipped. It’s all done digitally. It’s amazing world that we live in, Mike.

Mike Domitrz:
Absolutely.

Mike Domitrz:
You really work with a lot of people who have both a personal life and a family life, as far as business life, family life, personal life. How do you help people make it all work together? What are some tips, techniques, and strategies for the one out there saying, “Wait, I run my business, I run my family”? What about that? Yes, I can set aside this time on the work day to step aside, and they’re following all the steps and strategies that we’re giving right now. What are some additional things to take you to that next level when you’re looking at your comprehensive life?

Robyn Pearce:
Right. This one I’ve had a bit of practice at. I raised six children and have 17 grandchildren, so, yes, managing it all with the family is a big one. One of the techniques that I stumbled across as a young mum well before I was good at time management, but this was a really good strategy which I share with people. A couple of really quick ones is blocking out time for the family. It might be, for example, one night a week you don’t do things outside of the house. Or you don’t do things outside of the family, sorry. Another one could be to turn off all technology so that you’re actually having quality time together, you’re talking together, doing experiences together.

Robyn Pearce:
Another one was I realized when the children were all young, because they all came in a nine year period and that included a foster son with special needs, that I was so busy managing, doing stuff of all of this horde of small children that I was never having a special time with any one child. So, we instituted that. We put up a little chart on the fridge. Each child got to pick the activity they wanted to do with one parent, one child only, believe it or not, for half an hour a week, which doesn’t sound a lot, but it was that quality time.

Robyn Pearce:
I still have a beautiful memory of my then husband sitting on the floor, six-foot man, farming guy sitting on the floor with our one little three-year-old daughter–all the rest were boys–playing dolls tea parties. That was what she wanted to do, but she still remembers that and so does he. She’s now a mother in her forties. So, that’s one.

Robyn Pearce:
Another one is what I call a do nothing weekend. And that’s saying, “Okay, this weekend we are taking no commitments. We are just hanging out doing what we want to do. If somebody wants to stay in bed and read books all weekend that’s cool, but we’re not taking any appointments.”

Mike Domitrz:
I love it, and that’s a challenge for a lot of people to pull that off and make that work.

Mike Domitrz:
In addition to what we just gave, you gave very specific, which is awesome, what about the person who’s being interrupted by people? You know, that person who constantly wants to talk while you’re trying to work? How do you handle those interruptions when it comes to that time and energy management?

Robyn Pearce:
That’s a great question, Mike. Sometimes you have to just have that courageous conversation, but not everybody’s comfortable to do that. It may be you have to shift your environment in some way. One suggestion could be if you have a chair where people traditionally park, is you shift the chair [inaudible 00:22:07]. If you’ve got a chair by your desk or in your office, get rid of it.

Robyn Pearce:
Another really practical one is somebody sitting beside you or talking or they’re leaning on the partition, nattering away, and you need to move. So, perhaps you stand up and you say, “Look …” Grab something off your desk and say, “Look, I’ve just got to walk to,” blah blah, the elevator, the receptionist, whatever. “I’ll walk with you.” Or, it might be somebody really lonely that really needs a friend. Can you perhaps say to them, hardly lift your head up, but just say, “Oh, look, I can see you at lunchtime,” or, “Shall we catch up at four o’clock,” when it’s your lower energy time, or something along those lines? Just a few of the suggestions, Mike.

Mike Domitrz:
Well, you mentioned the courageous conversation, which obviously is a famous [inaudible 00:22:56] that some people may not be aware of. What would be a way to have that? Like, what would be the language you would use in that moment? Would you say to somebody, “Look, I love being able to talk with you. Unfortunately, when I’m in this work mode I’m not able to be fully present for you, and I get behind. I want to be fully present for you. I want this to work. Could we talk after work? Could we go for a drink? Could we go for a coffee?” How would you have that? Is that similar?

Robyn Pearce:
That’s perfect, that’s a great example. Another one that I locked into, really, when I just very first started my business was I’ve got a very favorite aunt. She’s very special. She’s now 95 and still going strong. So, I’m talking 27 years ago, you do the math. She was in the habit of … She hadn’t been in the habit of ringing me during workdays while I was working in a paid employment for an employer. She was respectful of that. But once I started working from home and running my own business, I think she though, “Oh, good. Well, I’m having my morning tea, I’ll ring up Robyn and have a chat.”

Robyn Pearce:
I realized the first time it happened that this had head to be nipped in the bud. And I said, “Peggy, I’d love to talk right now, I’m just on a deadline. Can I ring you tonight after 5:00?” It was a respectful language, but it was putting boundaries.

Mike Domitrz:
No, that’s great. That’s perfect. And of course, you’re great at this because of what you do with time and energy management. I love that differential you made earlier.

Mike Domitrz:
Robyn, I want to thank you. I want to make sure that all of our listeners can find you, which they can do at GettingAGrip.com. Getting a grip, or RobynPearce.com, which is P-E-A-R-C-E.com, Robyn Pearce. And Robyn’s with a Y, R-O-B-Y-N. Thank you so much for joining us.

Robyn Pearce:
My absolute pleasure, Mike. I love the work you’re doing. Thank you for asking me.

Mike Domitrz:
Oh, of course.

Mike Domitrz:
And for our listeners, you know what’s next. It is question of the week. Before I answer this week’s question of the week, I’d love to ask you a question. Would you please subscribe to this podcast, The RESPECT Podcast with Mike Domitrz? By subscribing, you can make a huge impact. Now you might be wondering, “Mike, how does my subscribing to your podcast make a huge impact?”

Mike Domitrz:
Well, here’s how. For every person that subscribes, it raises the rankings of the show in the search engines. So, for people who care about respect, like yourself, when they’re doing a search for a podcast, they’re more likely to find this show, thus providing an awesome opportunity for us to spread more respect around this world. All you do is hit subscribe under your podcast. Plus, the second benefit is by subscribing, you automatically get every episode right into your phone or whatever device you are listening to the podcast on. It happens automatically, so subscribing also makes your life easier.

Mike Domitrz:
Now, let’s get into this week’s question of the week. Oh, and by the way, you can always ask your questions of the week by joining us on Facebook in our discussion group. It’s called The RESPECT Podcast discussion group. Go there on Facebook and ask whatever questions you would like me to answer andr address in this segment of the show, and then listen to each episode to find out when your question is included.

Mike Domitrz:
This week’s question is, “Mike, what is a project you have not done that really intrigues you to wanting to do some time in your life?” For me, this is a mix between writing the script for either a Broadway kind of production, small production, I don’t mean large cast, big musical, or a movie. Both scripts would be to challenge our society on concepts and constructs relating to respect and how it shows up in our lives. Real deep thinking, thought provoking. That’s something that does intrigue me.

Mike Domitrz:
Now, I haven’t made it a priority, obviously, because I haven’t done it, all right? And if we know that it’s a priority, then we’d be doing it. So, when we say, “Oh, that’s a priority,” and then we haven’t done it … When you just look in the mirror and go, “No, it’s not.”

Mike Domitrz:
I know that’s not a priority, but it’s something I think about. I’d love to work with writers in Hollywood or producers in Hollywood and really create something powerful on this discussion that could reach millions all in a short time span. That’s something that does excite me, that I look forward to diving in to sometime in the future.

Mike Domitrz:
What about you? What’s a project you haven’t done that you would love to still do? I’d love to hear that. I’d love to read that from you. I hope you’ll share in our Facebook discussion group. That’s The RESPECT Podcast discussion group on Facebook, so hope you’ll join us there and share.

Mike Domitrz:
Do you know what I would love? I would love to hear your answer to this week’s question of the week. So, would you please answer what your answer would have been if you were asked that question today on the show? All you do is go to our Facebook page. We have a special group where we have these discussions called The RESPECT Podcast discussion group. The RESPECT Podcast discussion group, and share with us what would your answer have been to this week’s question of the week, and, if you take a moment, post us a new question for future episodes. What question would you like to hear me answer on an upcoming episode? That’s all done on Facebook in our special group, which is The RESPECT Podcast discussion group. Can’t wait to see you there.

Mike Domitrz:
Thank you for joining us in this episode of The RESPECT Podcast, exploring work, love, and life. This episode, like every episode, is brought to you by our organization, the Center for Respect, which you can find at CenterForRespect.com, and of course, you can find me, your host Mike Domitrz, at MikeSpeaks.com. Thank you so much for joining us.

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